Speaker Biographies

Russell Blackford (AUS)
Russell is an Australian writer, philosopher, and critic, based in Melbourne, Victoria. He was born in Sydney, and grew up in Lake Macquarie district, near Newcastle, NSW. He moved to Melbourne in 1979, and has lived there since. Russell teaches in the School of Philosophy and Bioethics at Monash University, where he is completing his second PhD. He is a Fellow of the Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies and editor-in-chief of The Journal of Evolution and Technology. As a fiction writer, Blackford specialises in science fiction, fantasy and horror fiction. His work includes four novels published by iBooks, three of them forming an original trilogy (The New John Connor Chronicles) set in the world of the Terminator movies. His non-fiction work frequently deals with issues involving science and society, particularly philosophical bioethics, cyberculture, transhumanism, and the history and current state of the science fiction genre. His work has appeared in many magazine, journals, and reference books, and has been featured most prominently in Quadrant, a monthly journal of literature and policy. It draws on his academic qualifications in a number of fields, which include First Class Honours degrees in both Arts and Law, a Ph.D on the return to myth in modern fictional narrative (as postulated by Northrop Frye), and a Master of Bioethics degree.

Paul Brown
Paul is an artist and writer specialising in art & technology. He is Chair of CAS – the Computer Arts Society http://www.computer-arts-society.org/ and Visiting Professor at the Centre for Computational Neuroscience and Robotics and Department of Informatics, University of Sussex, UK working on the Computational Intelligence, Creativity and Cognition: a multidisciplinary investigation project

Michael Burton
In 2007, Michael graduated from the Royal College of Art from the MA Design Interactions programme. Previous to this, he worked in Contemporary Dance at Laban, conservatoire and studied BA Fine Art Sculpture at Bretton Hall, Leeds University. Michael creates objects, images and films as insights into richly imagined scenarios of our future health and climate challenges, exploring the choices we face in our evolution as a species. His concepts delve into social, cultural and political enquiries, often considering people living at the extremes of a socio-economic scale. Michael has worked with organisations such as Foresight at the Government Office for Science on their 50-year horizon scan on tackling a future obesities epidemic. He exhibits and presents Internationally, most notably including work shown at the Museum of Modern Art, New York.

Linda Candy
Linda Candy is a researcher in practice-led methods for studying creativity in the arts and sciences. She writes articles about the creative process, collaborative work, the role of computer support and the methodologies for investigating these areas of research. She has a Bachelor of Arts, a Masters in Computer Aided Learning and a doctorate in Computer Science. Linda is a co-founder of the Creativity and Cognition conference series sponsored by the ACM and is active in promoting awareness about creativity support environments in the arts, computing and design communities. She is an editorial board member of the Behaviour and Information Technology and Knowledge Based Systems journals and has guest edited special issues on her subject area: for example, forthcoming in Leonardo, Design Studies and the International Journal of Human Computer Interaction. She has been a member of a number of international conference programme committees and has presented her work in the UK, Europe, Japan, Australia, New Zealand and the USA.

Revital Cohen
Revital Cohen (Jerusalem, 1981) is a designer and researcher who develops critical objects and provocative scenarios exploring the juxtaposition of the natural with the artificial. Her work spans across various mediums and includes collaborations with scientists, animal breeders and the NHS. After completing a BA in Contemporary Furniture Design at Buckinghamshire New University, she attained a Masters degree in Design Interactions from the Royal College of Art, London. Revital’s work has featured in academic publications as well as covered by the design press. She exhibits within varied contexts and locations – from scientific and academic conferences to art galleries and design fairs.

Nigel Cameron
Nigel is President of the Center for Policy on Emerging Technologies in Washington, DC, and Research Professor in the Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT), where he has been Director of the Center on Nanotechnology and Society and co-founded the Institute on Biotechnology and the Human Future. His books include The New Medicine: Life and Death after Hippocrates (1991), and he has edited Nanoscale: Issues and Perspectives for the Nano Century (2007). He has been a visiting scholar at UBS Wolfsberg in Switzerland, and a featured speaker at the Aspen Ideas Festival. He serves on the advisory boards of Nanotechnology Law and Business, the Converging Technologies Bar Association, and the World Healthcare Innovation and Technology Congress. He chaired the Technosapiens process that brought together leading liberals, conservatives, and technology leaders with transhumanists, and gave a keynote address at the 2006 Stanford Law School conference on enhancement technologies and human rights. Nigel has represented the United States on delegations to the United Nations General Assembly and UNESCO, and testified before the European Parliament and the US Congress..

etoy.CORPORATION
etoy.CORPORATION (since 1994) is art and invests all resources in the production of more art. The shareholder company represents the core and code of the corporate sculpture. It controls, protects, shares, and exploits the cultural substance (intellectual property / etoy trademarks) and the etoy.ART-COLLECTION. etoy intends to reinvest all financial earnings in art – the final link in the value chain.

Ernest Edmonds
Ernest Edmonds lives and works in Sydney Australia. His art is in the constructivist tradition and he first used computers in his art practice in 1968. He first showed an interactive work with Stroud Cornock in 1970. He first showed a generative time-based computer work in London in 1985. He has exhibited throughout the world, from Moscow to LA. He was born in London and studied Mathematics and Philosophy at Leicester University. He has a PhD in logic from Nottingham University. He has about 200 refereed publications in the fields of human-computer interaction, creativity and art. Artists Bookworks (UK) has recently published his book “On New Constructs in Art”. Ernest Edmonds is Professor of Computation and Creative Media at the University of Technology, Sydney where he runs a multi-disciplinary practice-based art and technology research group, the Creativity and Cognition Studios. In Sydney, he is represented by the Conny Dietzschold Gallery. Ernest Edmonds has held the position of University Dean, has sat on many funding and conference committees and was a pioneer in the development of practice-based PhD programmes. He founded the ACM Creativity and Cognition Conference series and was part of the founding team for the ACM Intelligent User Interface conference series. He has been an invited speaker in, for example, the UK, France, the USA, Australia, Japan and Malaysia.

Justina Robson
Justina Robson was born in Leeds, and studied philosophy and linguistics at the University of York. Robson attended the Clarion West Writing Workshop and was first published in 1994 in the British small press magazine The Third Alternative, but is best known as a novelist. Her debut novel Silver Screen was shortlisted for both the Arthur C Clarke Award and the BSFA Award in 2000. Her second novel, Mappa Mundi, was also shortlisted for the Arthur C Clarke Award in 2001. It won the 2000 Amazon.co.uk Writer’s Bursary. In 2004, Natural History, Robson’s third novel, was shortlisted for the BSFA Award, and came second in the John W Campbell Award. Robson’s novels have been noted for sharply-drawn characters, and an intelligent and deeply thought-out approach to the tropes of the genre. She has been described as “one of the very best of the new British hard SF writers”. Living Next-Door to the God of Love is a loose sequel to Natural History, inasmuch as it is set in the same universe. Keeping It Real marks the beginning of a series, the Quantum Gravity Books.

Steve Fuller
Steve is Professor of Sociology at the University of Warwick. He is best-known for his work in the field of ‘social epistemology’, which addresses normative philosophical questions about organized knowledge by historical and social scientific means. His most recent work has focused on the future of the public intellectual and the university, as well as the biological challenge to the social sciences, especially as it bears on the future of ‘humanity’ as a category in terms of which we define ourselves. Fuller is the author of 15 books, including The Knowledge Book: Key Concepts in Philosophy, Science and Culture (Acumen and McGill-Queens, 2007), New Frontiers in Science and Technology Studies (Polity, 2007), Science vs Religion? (Polity, 2007) and Dissent over Descent: Intelligent Design’s Challenge to Darwinism (Icon, 2008). He is the UK partner of the European Union’s Sixth Framework Project on the ‘Knowledge Politics of Converging Technologies’.

Norman M. Klein
Norman is a cultural critic, and both an urban and media historian, as well as a novelist. His books include The History of Forgetting: Los Angeles and the Erasure of Memory, Seven Minutes: The Life and Death of the American Animated Cartoon, and the data/cinematic novel, Bleeding Through: Layers of Los Angeles, 1920–86 (DVD-ROM with book). His next book will be The Vatican to Vegas: The History of Special Effects (2003). His essays appear in anthologies, museum catalogues, newspapers, scholarly journals, on the WWW – symptoms of a polymath’s career, from European cultural history to animation and architectural studies, to LA studies, to fiction, media design and documentary film. His work (including museum shows) centres on the relationship between collective memory and power, from special effects to cinema to digital theory, usually set in urban spaces; and often on the thin line between fact and fiction; about erasure, forgetting, scripted spaces, the social imaginary.

Andy Miah
Andy is Reader in New Media and Bioethics at the School of Media, Language and Music University of the West of Scotland, a Fellow at the Foundation for Art and Creative Technology (FACT) and a Fellow of the Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies. He has a PhD in bioethics and cultural studies and a Masters degree in medical law. He is author of Genetically Modified Athletes (2004 Routledge) and co-author with Emma Rich of The Medicalization of Cyberspace (2008, Routledge). He is a Steering Committee member and Panel Co-Chair for ISEA 2009, Belfast.

Fiona Raby
Fiona is a partner in the design practice Dunne & Raby. She was a founding member of the CRD Research Studio at the Royal College of Art where she worked as a Senior Research Fellow (1996-2001). She taught in Architecture at the RCA from 1996-2005 where she led ADS04 with Gerrard O’Carroll. She currently teaches in Design Interactions. Dunne & Raby were established 1994. Their projects have been exhibited and published internationally and are in the permanent collection of several museums including the MOMA, New York, FRAC, FNAC and the V&A Museum, London. Dunne & Raby have worked with Sony UK, National Panasonic, France Telecom and The Science Museum.  Design Noir: The Secret Life of Electronic Products (Princeton Architectural Press) was published in 2001.

Justina Robson
Justina Robson was born in Leeds, and studied philosophy and linguistics at the University of York. She worked in a variety of jobs – including secretary, technical writer, and fitness instructor – until becoming a full-time writer. Robson attended the Clarion West Writing Workshop and was first published in 1994 in the British small press magazine The Third Alternative, but is best known as a novelist. Her debut novel Silver Screen was shortlisted for both the Arthur C Clarke Award and the BSFA Award in 2000. Her second novel, Mappa Mundi, was also shortlisted for the Arthur C Clarke Award in 2001. It won the 2000 Amazon.co.uk Writer’s Bursary. In 2004, Natural History, Robson’s third novel, was shortlisted for the BSFA Award, and came second in the John W Campbell Award. Robson’s novels have been noted for sharply-drawn characters, and an intelligent and deeply thought-out approach to the tropes of the genre. She has been described as “one of the very best of the new British hard SF writers”[1]. Living Next-Door to the God of Love is a loose sequel to Natural History, inasmuch as it is set in the same universe. Keeping It Real marks the beginning of a series, the Quantum Gravity Books. On 27th July 2008 she spoke on BBC Radio 3 about Doctor Who and various other sci-fi shows for 25 minutes during the interval of the Doctor Who Prom.

Laura Sillars
Laura is Head of Programme at FACT. She leads FACT’s artistic programme and manages a team of curators and project managers to develop and deliver exhibitions, projects, education and collaboration programmes. Previously Senior Curator: Collaboration Programme at FACT, Curator: Public Programmes at Tate Liverpool and an Associate Lecturer for the Open University, she holds an MA in Art History from the Courtauld Institute of Art, a PGCE in Adult and Community Education from the Institute of Education and a BA from the University of York in History and History of Art. A member of the Liverpool John Moore’s Art and Design Academy Advisory Board, she is a Senior Research Fellow: Centre for Architecture and Visual Arts for the University of Liverpool, is a fellow of the Royal Society of the Arts and currently holds a Clore Leadership Fellowship.

Mike Stubbs
Mike has been Director of FACT since May 2007. Previously he was Head of Exhibitions at the Australian Centre for Moving Image (ACMI), Senior Research Resident at Dundee University’s School of Television Imaging and was Founding Director at Hull Time Based Arts (HTBA). During his career, Mike has commissioned over 250 interactive, site-specific, performative, sonic and moving-image based artworks. Originally educated at the Royal College of Art and Cardiff College of Art, Mike’s own internationally commissioned artwork encompasses broadcast films, video art, large-scale public projections and new media installation.

Nicola Triscott
Nicola is a cultural producer, working in the performing, interdisciplinary and visual arts. She founded The Arts Catalyst, the UK science-art agency, in 1993. As Director of The Arts Catalyst she has built alliances internationally between disciplines and commissioned more than 60 art projects over the last 15 years. Nicola writes and speaks regularly at international conferences on the interrelationships between art, science, technology and society, and cultural perspectives on space exploration. After studying physics at Imperial College and geography at University College London, Nicola worked in theatre and arts production, arts policy, arts centre management, and as a freelance arts consultant. Prior to setting up The Arts Catalyst, she was working and researching in southern, central and east Africa.

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